UCLA Labor Center

SCOTUS Decision on DACA & Resources

“DACA rally” by Victoria Pickering

***July 28, 2020 Update: The Trump administration announced on Tuesday, July 28th, that it will continue to defy the Supreme Court’s order to restore DACA. By doing so, the administration is effectively rejecting the judiciary’s authority and placing the lives of undocumented young people in danger. Read the DHS Memorandum on DACA here.

Content Below was Published on June 19th, 2020

The US Supreme Court ruled on Thursday, June 18th, to allow the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program to remain in place. The Dream Resource Center, at the UCLA Labor Center, celebrates this critical victory won by undocumented youth. DACA became a reality because of the continued organizing efforts of undocumented young people!

The ruling returns DACA to its initial 2012 form and reopens the DACA program to new applicants. However, we cannot know for sure whether DHS will accept new applications until they release guidance. All eligible individuals are encouraged to consult with a qualified and reputable immigration attorney to apply for, or renew, their DACA.

Although this decision is a win for our communities, DACA is not a permanent solution. We need to come together, organize, and demand a permanent solution for immigrant youth and all 11 million undocumented people living in the US. The fight for a welcoming and just society, where immigrant youth and their families can thrive­­, does not end with this decision.

As the fight for a permanent solution continues, the immigrant rights movement must also commit to fighting for justice for Black communities. We must echo the demand from the Black Lives Matter movement to defund the police and also be clear that we must abolish ICE. The immigrant rights movement must stand in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement, recognizing that our Black immigrant siblings live at the intersections of both movements.

DACA Application and Renewal Guidance Resources

The following information will help DACA recipients prepare for filing, but should not be considered as legal advice and should not replace legal advice from an attorney or certified representative. Everyone’s case is different, which is why we strongly urge DACA recipients and first-time applicants to consider seeking out assistance from local non-profit organizations that provide free to low cost legal assistance.

Meet Dream Summer 2019 Graduate, Abigail Gonzalez

We are ecstatic to announce that the UCLA Dream Resource Center’s Dream Summer 2019 fellows will be graduating this Sunday, August 18th! The fellows engaged in critical work, throughout the fellowship, to ensure that social justice continues to be a strong force within the United States. Each fellow performed a critical role to advance the work of the host organization they were placed with and to sustain the immigrant rights and labor movement. The graduation will celebrate the leadership, dedication, resilience, and growth exhibited by each one of the Dream Summer 2019 fellows. 

Meet Abigail Gonzalez, one of the Dream Summer 2019 fellowship graduates!

Placed at Equality California for Dream Summer 2019.

Biography:

Abigail Gonzalez was born on December 6th,1999 in La Barca, Jalisco, Mexico. When Abigail was just a six-month-old baby, her family immigrated to the United States for a better life and future. After moving to the U.S., Abigail grew up in the small neighborhood known as Boyle Heights located in Los Angeles, California. She attended First Street Elementary School, Hollenbeck Middle School, and graduated from Roosevelt High School in 2018. Throughout high school, Abigail was very active within her school and local community. She was class president for three years, was a four-year varsity softball player, was a member of the Mayor’s Youth Council, and a College Track scholar. 

Abigail is currently attending Pasadena City College (PCC) and will be transferring this fall to Pomona College, where she plans to pursue a degree in public policy. After graduating, Abigail hopes to work at a nonprofit organization that provides all immigrants⏤regardless of their immigration status⏤with educational opportunities, legal assistance, and mental health resources. Abigail’s career goal is tied to her personal life experience. Abigail comes from a mixed-status immigrant family, so she wants to empower her community and create positive social change because she is highly aware of the struggles immigrant families face. In particular, she understands how an individual’s immigration status can highly impact the type of opportunities available to them.   

In February of 2018, Abigail and her family were featured in NPR’s podcast Code Switch to discuss what living in a mixed-status immigrant household is like. Abigail’s mixed-status household includes her younger brother who is a U.S. citizen and her two older sisters who are both recipients of the program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). DACA provides eligible immigrant youth⏤who were brought to the U.S. as children without proper documentation⏤temporary relief from deportation and a work permit. Unlike her brother and sisters, Abigail is neither a U.S. citizen or eligible for DACA. She is currently undocumented because the program is no longer accepting new applicants, since President Trump rescinded the program. Abigail’s older sister, Miriam Gonzalez, is a plaintiff in the lawsuit suing the Trump administration for its decision to rescind DACA.

Abigail at the Census 2020 press conference, held by Los Angeles County Supervisor representative Hilda Solis, that addressed the potential inclusion of a citizenship question on the U.S. Census.

We asked Abigail: What was your experience with the fellowship like?

“As a Dream Summer fellow, I was assigned to work with Equality California (EQCA), the nation’s largest statewide LGBTQ civil rights organization. EQCA works on improving the lives of California’s LGBTQ community through grassroots organizing and political advocacy. This summer, I had the pleasure to work with EQCA’s 2020 Census outreach team. I was in charge of the outreach to college campuses in the Los Angeles County. Our goal was to engage LGBTQ and immigrant youth with the U.S. 2020 Census. Outreach was challenging because it is summer and many campuses do not have a lot of students present, but I was able to connect with five campuses that will allow EQCA to host tabling events for census outreach. These tabling events include talking to students about the importance of the 2020 Census and getting them to pledge to fill it out.

I also attended two press conferences, with EQCA, about the 2020 Census. The first press conference brought local leaders and community members together, right after the Supreme Court’s decision on the potential inclusion of a citizenship question in the 2020 Census. The second press conference was hosted by Assemblymember Reggie Jones-Sawyer in order to inform his district about the census work he is supporting. These two press conferences were significant because they were the first I had ever attended. They taught me about the work that other community organizations are doing regarding the U.S. Census.”

Abigail with Dream Summer Project Coordinator, Leticia Bustamante, at the 2020 Census press conference in Los Angeles. 

We asked Abigail: How has the fellowship helped you grow?

“If I am being completely honest, I never thought I would be able to have an opportunity like this because I am not eligible for DACA. Therefore, this fellowship has been nothing but a huge learning experience for me. It is the first fellowship that has allowed me to learn skills necessary for a job. This fellowship was a lot of firsts for me. It was my first time being in an office and professional setting. I never thought I would be able to experience this, at such a young age, because opportunities like these are rare to find when you are undocumented⏤and even more so when you do not have DACA. 

Overall, I have grown a lot professionally. Throughout the fellowship, I wrote professional emails, made professional phone calls, and attended staff meetings. These experiences helped develop my professional skills such as time management, organization, problem-solving, communication, and more. These are skills that one cannot develop and improve, if one is not in a professional setting. 

This fellowship was also great for networking. I met a lot of cool people who are doing great work! They have provided me with both professional and life advice. I have grown so much⏤both personally and professionally⏤in just a couple of weeks because of this fellowship.”    

Learn more about Dream Summer here.

 

Waking Dream – Free Film Screening

About:

Join us for a free film screening of Waking Dream and a follow-up panel discussion with the film’s participants!

Waking Dream is a documentary that weaves together the stories of six DACA recipients as they sit in limbo between deportation and a path to citizenship.

DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) has provided nearly 800,000 undocumented immigrant youth a chance to work legally, go to college, start businesses, and pursue the “American Dream.”

After DACA was rescinded, Waking Dream follows the unfolding fate of six of these young people as they fight for legal status in the U.S., struggle with the deportation of family members, and pursue their dreams.

View the film trailer here.

Date:

Thursday, June 20, 2019

Time:

6 – 8 PM

RSVP At:

http://bit.ly/DreamWaking

Location:

UCLA Downtown Labor Center

675 S. Park View St,

Los Angeles, CA 90057

Parking:

Street parking will be available outside of the UCLA Downtown Labor Center. Metered parking is free after 6 PM. We encourage you to take public transportation if possible to avoid parking issues.

Additional Information:

Light refreshments and food will be provided. If you need translation available, please let us know in advance.

Hosted By: 

UCLA Dream Resource CenterUCLA Labor Center, and iNationMedia

For Questions Contact: 

dreamresourcecenter@gmail.com

House passes the Dream and Promise Act

The American Dream and Promise Act  (H.R. 6) passed the House of Representatives on Tuesday and is now set to move on to the Senate. This is a significant victory for the immigrant rights movement! Passage of the American Dream and Promise Act would provide protection and a path to U.S. citizenship for an estimated 2.5 million immigrant youth, Temporary Protected Status (TPS) recipients and Deferred Enforced Departure (DED) beneficiaries. With many of the UCLA Dream Resource Center fellows and their families directly impacted by the potential passage of the Dream and Promise Act, we are reminded of the need to continue building the new generation of leaders within the immigrant rights movement. We will continue to help immigrant youth thrive and succeed!

Immigration Forum: Students Speak Out!

 

 

Students at University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) will host a forum, Immigration Forum: Students Speak Out!  to discuss recent policy developments, share personal narratives, and present recommendations as to how to how to support the immigrant in the months ahead. The Forum will be hosted on Monday, March 5th, the date the Trump administration had set a deadline for Congress to enact policy that would impact thousands of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). 

Join students and guest speakers for a conversation on immigration. Some of the topics that will be discussed are: common misconceptions regarding undocumented migration, contextualize DACA in a broader conversation on the factors that contribute to migration, and students will have opportunities to discuss the effects of recent legislative and policy issues, and make policy recommendations on how to best support the undocumented community. A student-led Resource Fair will also take place after the forum from 6:30pm-7:30pm.

The forum is being coordinated under the guidance of Ignacia Rodriguez, immigration attorney and policy advocate at the National Immigration Law Center (NILC), and in collaboration with the UCLA Institute for Research on Labor and Employment (IRLE) department and the Dream Resource Center (DRC).

 

 

Guest Speakers:

Abel Valenzuela • Professor of Chicana/o Studies and Urban Planning, and Director of the UCLA Institute for Research on Labor and Employment
Kent Wong • UCLA Labor Center Director

Gilbert Cedillo • Los Angeles City Council member, First District
Maria Elena Durazo • Democratic National Committee (DNC) Vice-Chair incumbent, UNITE HERE General Vice President for Immigration, Civil Rights and Diversity, currently running for California State Senator in the 24th District
Monica Garcia • Representative of Board District 2 in the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD)
Ernesto Rocha • community organizer and Membership Coordinator at Community Coalition

Performances by:

Grupo Folklorico de UCLA • a dance group that focuses on the regional and traditional dances of Mexico
Night of Cultura at UCLA • a Latinx performance group

 

 

RSVP at: UndocumentedUnafraid.net/rsvp
Questions?: Info@UndocumentedUnafraid.net

DACA Renewal Workshops

 

On September 5th 2017, President Trump ended the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

Current DACA recipients whose DACA expires before March 5th 2018 are eligible for renewal. The DACA renewal application must be received by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) by October 5th 2017.

If you need help renewing your DACA application, here’s a comprehensive list: DACA Renewal Efforts

 

DACA Renewal Scholarships: 

LC4DACA

  • Get a $495 scholarship for your daca renewal
  • You’ll need an ead card (work permit) with an expiration date on or before march 5, 2018
  • Fast – checks available same day or mailed the next business day
  • Available nationwide

Virtual: 

UnitedWeDream – DACA Renewal Network

  • LIVE DACA Renewal Broadcasts
  • Q&A with Top Attorneys & National Experts
  • Personalized DACA Renewal Plan
  • Notifications via Text and Email
  • Free Do-it-Yourself Online Application Tools by Top Lawyers
  • Where to get Trustworthy, Free or Low Cost Legal Help
  • Help with Saving for your DACA Fees

 Los Angeles: 

Advancing Justice LA – Free DACA Renewal Workshop

Date: September 21 & 28, 2017

Time: By appointment only

Location: 1145 Wilshire Ave. Los Angeles, 90017

 

CARECEN – Renew DACA Now!

Date: Monday and Wednesday

Time: 8:30am – 4:30pm, walk-in

Location: 2845 W. 7th St., Los Angeles, CA 90005

Date: Monday thru Friday

Time: 2-5pm, walk in

Location: 16501 Sherman Way, Suite 220, Van Nuys, CA 91406

 

CHIRLA – Free DACA Renewal Clinic

Date: Monday, September 18, 2017

Time: 10:00am – 5pm

Location: 400 S Hope St., 18th Floor, Los Angeles, 90071

 

Pop Up Clinic Legal Aid – Free Information Session & DACA Renewal

Date: TBA

Time: TBA

Location: TBA

 

Public Council – Free DACA Renewal Clinics/Renovación gratuita de DACA

Date: September 22, 23, 24, 29, 30 & Oct 1

Location: 610 S Ardmore Ave, Los Angeles, California 90005

Bay Area

SIREN

Date: September 19, 2017

Time: 1pm – 7pm

Location: Gilroy Public Library, 350 West 6th Street

 

Date: September 20, 2017

Time: 1pm – 4:30pm

Location: Mission College, 3000 Mission College Boulevard

 

Date: September 22, 2017

Time: 1pm – 4:30pm

Location: 1415 Koll Circle, Suite 108, San Jose

 

Date: September 26, 2017

Time: 10am – 5:00pm

Location: 1415 Koll Circle, Suite 108, San Jose

 

Date: September 26, 2017

Time: 10am – 5:00pm

Location: 1415 Koll Circle, Suite 108, San Jose

 

Date: October 3, 2017

Time: 10am – 5:00pm

Location: 1415 Koll Circle, Suite 108, San Jose

Stockton

California Rural Legal Assistance Foundation – DACA Workshop and Informational Forum

Date: September 27, 2017

Time: 6pm

Location: 338 E. Market St, Stockton, CA

Sharing is caring! If you know of other DACA clinics/resources, please send information to dreamresourcecenter@gmail.

DACA Has Been Rescinded, This Is What You Need To Know

 

The Trump administration has officially phase out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. The end of this program means life-changing consequences for young people and their communities. Now, more than ever, the Dream Resource Center remains committed to immigrant youth and the fight for immigrant rights.

 

This is what you need to know about this decision:  

 

  • As of today, September 5, 2017, US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is no longer accepting first-time DACA applications.

 

  • For current DACA recipient, the Employment Authorization Document (EAD or “work permit”) is valid until the expiration date on your EAD card even if that is after March 5, 2018.

 

  • Pending DACA initial and DACA renewal applications filed before September 5, 2017 until March 5, 2018, will continue to be processed.

 

  • DACA renewal applications from current beneficiaries set to expire between Sept. 5, 2017 and March 5, 2018, will be accepted if the renewal application has been received by Oct. 5, 2017.

 

  • You can no longer apply for Advance Parole to travel outside the country. If you have a pending Advance Parole associated with DACA it will be closed and your fee refunded.

 

  • If you are out of the country with DACA based Advance Parole we encourage you to work with an attorney and return to United States as soon as practicable.

 

  • If your EAD is lost or stolen and needs to be replaced you can file for a replacement.

 

  • Even if your DACA EAD remains valid, being a DACA recipient may not protect you if you encounter ICE.

 

  • The Immigrant Legal Resource Center (ILRC) created a helpful handout addressing work permits and employment, Social Security Numbers, state ID cards, travel on Advance Parole, Know Your Rights and more – we highly recommend you review this information.

 

Courtesy of the UCLA Immigration Legal Services.

Senator Kamala Harris Hosts DACA Roundtable

 

 

On Monday, August 28, 2017, Senator Kamala Harris held a roundtable at the UCLA Labor Center with immigrant youth who are under the protection of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) policy. Since its enactment in 2012, the program has changed the lives of thousands of young people who have lived in the U.S. since they were children. DACA has allowed undocumented immigrant youth to obtain work authorization, it has provided temporary legal protection from deportation, and has given thousands to pursue educational opportunities. However, the program is at risk and can be terminated at any minute, this means serious consequences for immigrant youth, their families, and their communities. The roundtable was in partnership with Sen. Harris’ team, FWD.us, CHIRLA, and Korean Resource Center, to bring attention to the issue and hear from the people who are directly impacted.

 

The UCLA Labor Center’s Dream Resource Center believes that young people deserve the right to learn, be healthy, and pursue their dreams – regardless of immigration status.  Since its founding in 2011, the center has emerged as a national source for innovative research, education, and advocacy on immigration issues. Our work is critical to ensure immigrant youth continue to be at the forefront of the national conversations that directly impact their lives and families.