UCLA Labor Center

Waking Dream – Free Film Screening

About:

Join us for a free film screening of Waking Dream and a follow-up panel discussion with the film’s participants!

Waking Dream is a documentary that weaves together the stories of six DACA recipients as they sit in limbo between deportation and a path to citizenship.

DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) has provided nearly 800,000 undocumented immigrant youth a chance to work legally, go to college, start businesses, and pursue the “American Dream.”

After DACA was rescinded, Waking Dream follows the unfolding fate of six of these young people as they fight for legal status in the U.S., struggle with the deportation of family members, and pursue their dreams.

View the film trailer here.

Date:

Thursday, June 20, 2019

Time:

6 – 8 PM

RSVP At:

http://bit.ly/DreamWaking

Location:

UCLA Downtown Labor Center

675 S. Park View St,

Los Angeles, CA 90057

Parking:

Street parking will be available outside of the UCLA Downtown Labor Center. Metered parking is free after 6 PM. We encourage you to take public transportation if possible to avoid parking issues.

Additional Information:

Light refreshments and food will be provided. If you need translation available, please let us know in advance.

Hosted By: 

UCLA Dream Resource CenterUCLA Labor Center, and iNationMedia

For Questions Contact: 

dreamresourcecenter@gmail.com

Meet Dream Summer 2019 fellow Dani Alderete

The UCLA Dream Resource Center (DRC) finalized their selection of fellows for the 2019 Dream Summer fellowship and will be kicking off the fellowship from June 20th to June 22nd! The next generation of immigrant youth social justice leaders will be joining the DRC for a three day kick-off filled with leadership and professional development workshops and on-the-ground experience in social justice movement building.

Forty-two amazing fellows were selected this year for the 2019 Dream Summer fellowship! Meet Dani Alderete, a finalist who the DRC wants to highlight because of his continued work in the immigrant rights movement and a returning Dream Summer fellow! Dani graduated from Dream Summer 2018 but will be joining the DRC for Dream Summer 2019 to continue developing his skills!

Dani Alderete

Biography

Dani Alderete was born in Cuautla, Morelos, México and goes by Him/They pronouns. They arrived to the United States at the age of four and has lived in Long Beach ever since. Dani started kindergarten in the Long Beach Unified School District and navigated primary school without knowing how to speak English. The advocacy and assistance of Dani’s mother, as well as teachers, staff, and neighbors, helped Dani become adjusted to living in the U.S. Dani was always aware of their family’s undocumented immigration status; however, it became more salient when Dani started high school. During high school, Dani became aware of the various barriers ahead due to their immigration status such as being ineligible to apply for a driver’s license and being ineligible to receive financial aid for college.

Yet Dani maintained hope for the future and persevered by graduating from California State University, Long Beach (CSULB) with a B.A. in Human Development and minors in Queer Studies, Spanish, and Gerontology. During Dani’s undergraduate career, they had the opportunity to be a part of the 2018 Dream Summer fellowship. The validating and caring community that Dani found in Dream Summer, encouraged Dani to stay connected and build a community with immigrant peers at CSULB by joining the student organization For Undocumented Empowered Leaders (FUEL).

Dani leading a “Stress Management with Aromatherapy” workshop during Dream Summer 2018.

Dani plans to attend graduate school and is currently working on applications for programs in college counseling/student services and mental health services. After graduating, Dani’s goal is to work at an AB540/Undocumented Center to help immigrant students reach their educational goals. Dani knows how difficult it is to access and navigate higher education as an undocumented immigrant in the U.S., so they wants to assist in creating inclusive, accessible, and equitable spaces for immigrant students. In the future, Dani also hopes to open up a private practice that provides mental health therapy and career coaching to the LGBTQIA+ community and immigrant communities.

Dani sharing a significant moment they experienced during the 2018 Dream Summer fellowship.

Why the Dream Summer fellowship?

“I applied to Dream Summer because I wanted to build community with other immigrant youth and learn more about community organizing. Since middle school, I was aware about my undocumented immigrant status and always had a desire to get involved in the immigrant rights movement. However, I was unsure of how to get involved and experienced deep anxiety and fear about sharing my immigration status with other people. I would frequently run into Facebook videos featuring Dream Summer alumni that the UCLA Dream Resource Center would post on their page. The videos were inspirational and I saw the amazing work that fellows were doing throughout the fellowship and later on as Dream Summer alumni. That inspiration and my desire to get involved are some of the main reasons why I applied to Dream Summer.”

-Dani Alderete

Learn more about Dream Summer here.

 

Meet Dream Summer 2019 fellow Paulina Ruiz

The UCLA Dream Resource Center (DRC) finalized their selection of fellows for the 2019 Dream Summer fellowship and will be kicking off the fellowship from June 20th to June 22nd! The next generation of immigrant youth social justice leaders will be joining the DRC for a three day kick-off filled with leadership and professional development workshops and on-the-ground experience in social justice movement building.

Forty-two amazing fellows were selected this year for the 2019 Dream Summer fellowship! Meet Paulina Ruiz, a finalist who the DRC wants to highlight because of her continued work in the immigrant rights movement and a returning Dream Summer fellow! Paulina graduated from Dream Summer 2018 but will be joining the DRC for Dream Summer 2019 to continue developing her skills!

Paulina Ruiz

Biography:

Paulina Ruiz was born in Chihuahua, Mexico and arrived to the United States at the age of six. Since then, she has resided in Los Angeles and graduated from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) with a B.A. in Spanish Literature and a minor in Mexican Studies. After graduating, Paulina decided to utilize her language skills to aid and defend the immigrant community. As an immigrant rights activist with a disability, Paulina’s biggest goal is to bring out of the shadows more marginalized people like herself. She firmly believes it is not only important to bring more people like herself out of the shadows but to also strengthen intersectionality in the immigrant rights movement, by teaching individuals how to effectively organize for the immigrant differently-abled community.

Paulina leading a workshop entitled “Activism: Ableism and the Immigrant Movement” during Dream Summer 2018.

Paulina provides workshops, to organizations and individuals involved in the immigrant rights movement, that teach how to make and take space with people of different abilities. In her workshops, she explains key barriers that people with disabilities and an immigrant background may face such as lack of access to adequate healthcare, employment opportunities and education. Alongside this work, she also mentors individuals with disabilities on how to fight social norms that limit the space they hold in society. Although the barriers to equality for both immigrants and people with disabilities are huge—and maintaining a space in the immigrant rights movement is tough for people with disabilities—Paulina seeks to put a face to the millions of people in her situation who are still in the shadows. She wants to live to see a world where people with disabilities and immigrants are respected and have the opportunity to hold positions of authority that can lead to positive social change for both groups.

Paulina at the 2018 Dream Summer closing retreat.

Why the Dream Summer fellowship?

Paulina decided to apply to Dream Summer again because it is an innovative fellowship and a stepping stone in the immigrant rights movement that holds space for people with different abilities. She has seen firsthand how welcoming the mentors at Dream Summer are and how willing they are to accommodate people with disabilities. Paulina knows that Dream Summer can open many doors, since the program helps fellows build their skills by placing them in social justice organizations across the U.S. She is sure Dream Summer will open more unimaginable opportunities for her and other immigrant rights advocates. She wants to encourage others to take a leap of faith and seek this opportunity—like she did—because it is life changing.

Learn more about Dream Summer here.

 

House passes the Dream and Promise Act

The American Dream and Promise Act  (H.R. 6) passed the House of Representatives on Tuesday and is now set to move on to the Senate. This is a significant victory for the immigrant rights movement! Passage of the American Dream and Promise Act would provide protection and a path to U.S. citizenship for an estimated 2.5 million immigrant youth, Temporary Protected Status (TPS) recipients and Deferred Enforced Departure (DED) beneficiaries. With many of the UCLA Dream Resource Center fellows and their families directly impacted by the potential passage of the Dream and Promise Act, we are reminded of the need to continue building the new generation of leaders within the immigrant rights movement. We will continue to help immigrant youth thrive and succeed!

Ford Foundation Grants the Labor Center $750k for worker and immigrant initiatives

Image By Ryan Rodrick Beiler/Shutterstock

The UCLA Newsroom reports that “UCLA has received $1.5 million from the Ford Foundation for efforts to help disadvantaged populations, including children and youth from immigrant families and undocumented and low-wage workers. Grants of $750,000 each will go to the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies’ Institute for Immigration, Globalization, and Education and the UCLA Labor Center, part of the UCLA College’s Institute for Research on Labor and Employment.”

The grants will aid the UCLA Labor Center’s mission to improve working conditions for low-wage workers, including immigrants and young workers. More specifically, the funding will support the UCLA Labor Center’s projects, known as the Dream Resource Center and ReWork, to create a just economy, strong families and communities.

Our director, Kent Wong, stated: “This new support from the Ford Foundation will make it possible for the UCLA Labor Center to continue to partner with workers, people of color and young people to promote social, racial and economic justice in higher education and the workplace. These partnerships have helped Los Angeles emerge as a national center to raise the minimum wage, advance the rights of immigrant youth and workers and support multiracial worker movements.”

Read the entire article here: http://bit.ly/2whqWSD.

2019 Immigrant Justice Fellowship Kick-Off

 

In February 2019, the Dream Resource Center (DRC) kicked off the second year of the Immigrant Justice Fellowship (IJF), our California-wide rapid-response fellowship for immigrant youth! During the kick-off, fellows gathered to build community, participate in trainings, and prepare for the rapid-response work they are now leading for the next seven months across the state of California. This year, the DRC partnered with the following fellows and organizations:

 

 

Fellow: Adanna Ilori

Organization: Sacramento Immigration Coalition

Region: Sacramento

 

 

 

 

Fellow: Brenda Gutierrez Ramirez

Organization: Resilience OC

Region: Orange County

 

 

 

 

Fellow: Kristina Olea

Organization: Faith in the Valley (Kern County)

Region: Central Valley

 

 

 

 

Fellow: Mario Perez

Organization: Inland Coalition for Immigrant Justice

Region: Inland Empire

 

 

 

Fellow: Mayra Pelagio

Organization: Santa Clara Rapid Response Network

Region: Silicon Valley

 

 

 

Fellow: Maythe Alderete Gonzalez

Organization: Long Beach Immigrant Rights Coalition

Region: Los Angeles

 

 

 

Learn more about our 2019 Immigrant Justice Fellows.

Here’s a look at five highlights from the kick-off:

1) The DRC led a plenary titled, “From the Frontlines: Lessons Learned from Rapid Response.” The plenary engaged DRC partners and IJF alumni in a powerful discussion regarding rapid-response work in California, such as the current landscape, best practices and strategies, and reflections from grassroots organizers.

Plenary participants:

  • Vanessa Alderete, Deputy Director of Constituent Services for U.S. Senator Kamala Harris (Left)
  • Jennaya Dunlap, Deportation Defense Coordinator for the Inland Coalition for Immigrant Justice (Middle)
  • Ana Ramirez, OC Rapid Response Coordinator for Resilience OC & IJF Alumna (Right)

 

2) The fellows participated in the 23rd Annual UCLA Health Care Symposium, “Immigration & Health: Status, Access, and Bridging the Disparity.” The symposium explored the intersection of immigration and the healthcare system and how to improve access to healthcare for immigrants. Watch the video below for what the fellows learned about immigration and health!

 

3) UCLA alumna and immigrant rights leader Yadira Hernandez led an interactive deportation defense training for the fellows. The training was grounded in her own successful campaign to get her father released from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) custody after he was detained for a traffic violation in Nevada.

Yadira midway through her deportation defense training!

Yadira speaking to the fellows about her father’s detainment.

 

4) The DRC engaged experts in the immigrant rights field in order to discuss California immigration policies as well as provide skill-based trainings on communications, storytelling, public speaking, self-care, and community wellness.

Fellows engaged during a communications training.

 

5) Throughout the kick-off, the fellows engaged in conversations with one another on how to take what they learned back to their communities. The fellows plan to share resources with one another and develop community presentations throughout the fellowship.

Mayra Pelagio and Adanna Ilori discussing what they learned.

 

Learn more about the Immigrant Justice Fellowship!

 

Meet The 2019 Immigrant Justice Fellows

We are excited to announce that the 2019 Immigrant Justice fellows have been selected. Learn about them below:

Adanna Ilori

SACRAMENTO FELLOW

Placed at Sacramento Immigration Coalition

Biography

Adanna Ilori was born in Lagos, Nigeria and has lived in Northern California since she was ten years old. She is currently a double major in Design and Managerial Economics at UC Davis. She is a passionate advocate for the rights of the LGBTQIA community and undocumented immigrant community. At UC Davis, she interned for the AB540 and Undocumented Student Center on campus to ensure that undocumented students had the resources they needed to succeed. She educated students on policies; contributed to the center’s web page; and outreached to middle schools, staff, and faculty regarding federal, state and local immigration policies. Since high school, Adanna has advocated for the rights of the LGBTQIA community such as by providing resources to and working as a caregiver for Black LGBT elders.

Why the Immigrant Justice Fellowship (IJF)?

Adanna applied to the Immigrant Justice Fellowship because as an immigrant she knows firsthand the unique challenges immigrants face in getting internships, securing jobs and overall attaining a better quality of life. She wants to give back to the undocumented immigrant community and help represent their voices.

Personal hobbies and interests

Adanna’s personal interests and hobbies include fashion design and photography. She has advocated for the African American community by designing clothes inspired by African culture. Her garment designs have been featured in fashion shows and shown the fashion industry the intrinsic beauty of Africa and its people.

Brenda Gutierrez Ramirez

ORANGE COUNTY FELLOW

Placed at Resilience OC

Biography

Brenda Gutierrez Ramirez was born in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico and has lived in Anaheim, California for 15 years. She graduated from the University of California, Santa Cruz with a B.A. in Anthropology and minored in Film and Digital Media. Brenda is passionate about grassroots organizing for social justice. She was a member of MEChA de UCSC for three years, where she learned and practiced student agency and student organizing. MEChA de UCSC taught her about social justice and enabled her to get out of her comfort zone.

Why the Immigrant Justice Fellowship (IJF)?

Brenda applied to the Immigrant Justice Fellowship to improve her skills as a grassroots organizer and to help out her community. For Brenda, IJF represents an opportunity to engage with individuals that have a similar background as her. Being around folks with similar backgrounds, empowers and encourages her to continue with her social justice work.

Personal hobbies and interests

Brenda loves spending time with her family and dog. Watching movies and funny shows are her favorite pastime. She also enjoys visiting natural places with her friends.

Kristina Olea

CENTRAL VALLEY FELLOW

Placed at Faith in the Valley (Kern County)

Biography

Kristina Olea was born in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico and came to the United States at two years of age. The youngest of 11 children, she was the first one in her family to graduate from college. She graduated with a B.S. in Business Administration and an emphasis in Economics from the California State University, Fresno. She is currently an immigration and criminal case manager and loves every second of it. Her professional goal is to attend law school and eventually open up her own business.

Why the Immigrant Justice Fellowship (IJF)?

Kristina applied to the Immigrant Justice Fellowship because she is passionate about labor rights. She specifically wants to make a difference in agricultural labor laws. As a resident of the Central Valley, California’s single most productive agricultural region, Kristina understands the lack of resources and protections agricultural laborers have.

Personal hobbies and interests

Kristina enjoys baking. She is a self-taught baker, but thanks to YouTube she has gained a lot of baking techniques.

Mario Perez

INLAND EMPIRE FELLOW

Placed at Inland Coalition for Immigrant Justice

Biography

Mario Perez was born in the capital of Mexico known as Mexico City. He arrived to the United States when he was five years of age. As a person directly impacted by the current state of the U.S. immigration system, Mario is passionate about shining a different light on the issues that face the immigrant community. His current goal is to pursue a career in journalism to cover immigration issues. His ultimate goal is to become more involved in the immigrant community by providing the support they need to gain justice.

Why the Immigrant Justice Fellowship (IJF)?

Mario applied to the Immigrant Justice Fellowship to become more involved in the immigrant rights movement and to further develop his leadership skills as an organizer. Through the program, he hopes to learn how to effectively fight for the rights of immigrants and become a voice for the immigrant community, so that they are no longer excluded from decisions that directly impact them.

Personal hobbies and interests

Mario enjoys the arts, fashion, music, and visiting museums.

Mayra Pelagio

SILICON VALLEY FELLOW

Placed at Santa Clara Rapid Response Network

Biography

Mayra Pelagio and her family moved to the United States in 2009 from León, Guanajuato, Mexico. She graduated from UC Davis with a B.S. in Environmental Science and Management (ESM) and minored in Wildlife, Fish, Conservation Biology. Throughout her undergraduate career, she worked on programs that served the undocumented immigrant and low-income student community. One of her biggest accomplishments was establishing the BikEmpower program, which is structured around sustainability, empowerment and community building. In the program, students are taught bicycle repairing skills which they use to repair a refurbished bicycle they are given by the school. After graduating from UC Davis, Mayra advocated for the passing of the federal DREAM Act in Washington D.C with members of congress. She is currently pursuing her master’s degree in environmental studies at San Jose State University.

Why the Immigrant Justice Fellowship (IJF)?

Mayra applied to the Immigrant Justice Fellowship because she wants to expand the resources that were available to her, as a high school student, to the broader immigrant community.

Personal hobbies and interests

Mayra loves hiking, camping, and bird watching.

Maythe Alderete Gonzalez

LOS ANGELES FELLOW

Placed at Long Beach Immigrant Rights Coalition

Biography

Maythe Alderete Gonzalez was born in Cuautla, Morelos, Mexico. She arrived to the United States at the age of two and has lived in Long Beach ever since. She is currently pursuing her B.A. in Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies and a minor in Human Development at California State University, Long Beach. Maythe is actively involved in creating a safe space for undocumented immigrants by sitting as an active board member for student organizations such as For Undocumented Empowered Leaders (FUEL) and Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies Student Association (WGSSSA).

Why the Immigrant Justice Fellowship (IJF)?

Maythe applied to the Immigrant Justice Fellowship to enhance her professional, networking, cultural competency, and ethical decision making skills. Through the Immigrant Justice Fellowship, she hopes to discover her personal, academic, and career goals.

Personal hobbies and interests

Sewing and photography have become Maythe’s two biggest hobbies to express her creativity through. She began a project named “Undocu Journey” in which she photographs undocumented immigrants and asks: who are you outside of this undocumented identity? The purpose of the project is to provide viewers a different perspective of each photographed individual, as a means to end the dehumanization of undocumented immigrants.

Learn more about the Immigrant Justice Fellowship

 

Dream Summer 2019 Facebook Live Q&A

 

The Dream Resource Center is currently seeking applicants for their Dream Summer 2019 fellowship. To help potential applicants, the Dream Resource Center will be hosting a Facebook Live Q&A session about Dream Summer on January 29th at 2PM PST/5PM EST. Dream Summer empowers immigrant youth to be the next generation of social justice leaders. Dream Summer fellows receive a $5,000 fellowship award for their participation in the program, leadership and professional development training, and become part of a national alumni network of over 650 immigrant rights leaders. During the Facebook Live Q&A session (http://bit.ly/DSFacebookLive), Dream Summer alumni will go over:

1) The application process.

2) Provide tips on how to make an application stand out.

3) Share their experience as fellows.

To learn more about Dream Summer and to apply go to http://bit.ly/DSapply. The deadline to apply is February 15, 2019 at 12:00 PM PST.

For questions, please contact Dream Summer Coordinators Mayra Castro and Leticia Bustamante at ucladreamsummer@gmail.com.

UndocuStories: Journeys of Justice & Freedom

About:

UndocuStories: Journeys of Justice & Freedom is the culmination of an eight week theater workshop by members of the undocumented immigrant community and allies. This evening of original theater, sketches, movement and poetry will showcase the incredible power of the immigrant community! Over the course of eight weeks, immigrants and allies delved into the issues impacting the immigrant community to create this original visionary piece. Grounded in community, and utilizing comedy and theatre of the oppressed, this performance shifts the dominant narrative of the undocumented community.

Join us for a night of laughter, reflection, and power! Translation for the performance is available in Korean, Tagalog and Spanish. Please request translation ahead of time. The doors will open at 6:30 pm for guests.

This project was made possible by a generous Artist-in-Residence grant from the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs. The workshop was facilitated by artist and comedian Kristina Wong, with guest artist Jessica Emmanuel, and hosted by the Dream Resource Center. Contributing guests speakers at the workshop include: Yael Pineda, Betty Jaspeado, and Mario Escobar. Participants starring in the performance include: Ghislaine Dwarka, Ana Lujan, Aldair Arriola Gomez, Ayala Gray, Georgina Rios Escobar, and Gustavo A. Guerra Vasquez.

Date & Time: November 8th | 7:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Location: UCLA Labor Center, 675 S. Park View St, Los Angeles, CA 90057

Contact: dreamresourcecenter@gmail.com

 

 

 

Immigration Forum: Students Speak Out!

 

 

Students at University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) will host a forum, Immigration Forum: Students Speak Out!  to discuss recent policy developments, share personal narratives, and present recommendations as to how to how to support the immigrant in the months ahead. The Forum will be hosted on Monday, March 5th, the date the Trump administration had set a deadline for Congress to enact policy that would impact thousands of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). 

Join students and guest speakers for a conversation on immigration. Some of the topics that will be discussed are: common misconceptions regarding undocumented migration, contextualize DACA in a broader conversation on the factors that contribute to migration, and students will have opportunities to discuss the effects of recent legislative and policy issues, and make policy recommendations on how to best support the undocumented community. A student-led Resource Fair will also take place after the forum from 6:30pm-7:30pm.

The forum is being coordinated under the guidance of Ignacia Rodriguez, immigration attorney and policy advocate at the National Immigration Law Center (NILC), and in collaboration with the UCLA Institute for Research on Labor and Employment (IRLE) department and the Dream Resource Center (DRC).

 

 

Guest Speakers:

Abel Valenzuela • Professor of Chicana/o Studies and Urban Planning, and Director of the UCLA Institute for Research on Labor and Employment
Kent Wong • UCLA Labor Center Director

Gilbert Cedillo • Los Angeles City Council member, First District
Maria Elena Durazo • Democratic National Committee (DNC) Vice-Chair incumbent, UNITE HERE General Vice President for Immigration, Civil Rights and Diversity, currently running for California State Senator in the 24th District
Monica Garcia • Representative of Board District 2 in the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD)
Ernesto Rocha • community organizer and Membership Coordinator at Community Coalition

Performances by:

Grupo Folklorico de UCLA • a dance group that focuses on the regional and traditional dances of Mexico
Night of Cultura at UCLA • a Latinx performance group

 

 

RSVP at: UndocumentedUnafraid.net/rsvp
Questions?: Info@UndocumentedUnafraid.net