UCLA Labor Center

Immigrant Justice California Health Resource Guide

 

The Immigrant Justice California Health Resource Guide, from the UCLA Dream Resource Center (DRC) and UCLA Labor Center, connects immigrant and refugee communities—including uninsured and/or undocumented community members—to critical services that are affordable and accessible in the State of California. The resource guide provides a list of low-cost, culturally appropriate health care, domestic violence, and mental health services in the Central Valley, Inland Empire, Orange County, and San Diego regions of Southern California.

The guide is available in six languages: Amharic, Arabic, English, French, Haitian Creole, and Spanish. To download the guide, please click on the language you need below:

On December 6, the UCLA Dream Resource Center hosted a webinar to present the contents of the guide and discuss what organizations can do to get this guide to as many community members as possible. Watch the webinar at youtu.be/AZ44a0-QOhM.

Asylum seekers, refugees, and immigrant families face numerous barriers to accessing resources and services. Please share the resource guide and webinar with your networks to help spread the word about these critical services that our immigrant communities need. You can use the #ImmigrantHealthJustice digital toolkit to help spread the word. View the toolkit at bit.ly/ImmigrantHealthJustice.

We Matter: A Poem for Immigrant Justice

The UCLA Dream Resource Center (DRC) invites you to read “We Matter,” a poem by 2020-21 Immigrant Justice fellow Sara Alagha. The Immigrant Justice Fellowship is the DRC’s 12-month California-based fellowship that provides emerging leaders organizing and advocacy experience in the immigrant rights movement. Fellows are placed with on-the-ground organizations that address the criminalization of immigrants and health and wellness issues.

Sara was placed with the Partnership for the Advancement of New Americans (PANA), a research, public policy, and community organizing hub dedicated to advancing the full economic, social, and civic inclusion of refugees. Throughout the fellowship, Sara worked alongside PANA to assist immigrant and refugee communities primarily from Syria and Burma. Touched by Sara’s dedication to justice, many community members provided Sara a dua (Arabic word of prayer). They prayed for her health, wealth, family, and success.

Sara wrote the poem “We Matter” to express her gratitude for their prayers and to express the deep connection she has with community members. As an immigrant from Syria, Sara understands firsthand the challenges community members are facing. “Poetry is highly valued in my culture, ‘We Matter’ shows appreciation to my culture and community. The poem highlights the words of gratitude community members gave me and emphasizes their resilience and compassion, despite the trauma many of them have been through.”- Sara Alagha